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Category: Computer Networks

Explore topics such as data communication, network protocols, and network architecture to build a strong foundation. Whether you’re navigating TCP/IP, understanding subnetting, or delving into network security, our guide covers crucial keywords that students widely search for. Empower yourself with insights into networking fundamentals, enhancing your knowledge in this vital field. Join us on a journey through the intricacies of Computer Networks, where connectivity meets the most searched-for topics in network education.

Understanding IPv6 Addressing

Understanding IPv6 Addressing

IPv6, or Internet Protocol version 6, is the most recent version of the Internet Protocol, which serves as the foundation for communication on the Internet. It was developed to overcome limitations posed by its predecessor, IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4), and to address the growing needs of the evolving internet. IPv6 is a 128-bit long address standard, designed to provide a vastly expanded address space compared to the 32-bit addresses used in IPv4. IPv6 addresses are expressed as eight groups…

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Distance Vector and State Link Routing Protocols

Distance Vector and State Link Routing Protocols

Routing protocols are fundamental to network communication, and two prominent categories are Distance Vector and State Link protocols. Distance Vector protocols, exemplified by Routing Information Protocol (RIP), make routing decisions based on cumulative distances to destinations, conveyed through periodic updates. They employ algorithms like Bellman-Ford and rely on routing tables to determine the best paths. However, the convergence time can be slower due to periodic updates, and scalability may be challenging in large networks. Distance Vector Protocol A Distance Vector…

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Advanced Routing Protocols – EIGRP and BGP

Advanced Routing Protocols – EIGRP and BGP

Routing protocols play a crucial role in directing network traffic efficiently. Two advanced routing protocols widely used in large-scale networks are Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) and Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) EIGRP is an advanced routing protocol developed by Cisco Systems. It is designed for use within an autonomous system (AS) and is known for its rapid convergence and low bandwidth usage. EIGRP incorporates features of both distance vector and link-state routing protocols….

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Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

DHCP is a network protocol that automatically assigns IP addresses and other network configuration information to devices on a network. It eliminates the need for manual configuration of network settings, making it easier to manage and scale a network. Key Components of DHCP DHCP Server DHCP Client DHCP Lease IP Address Pool DHCP Process DHCP Discover: When a device joins a network, it broadcasts a DHCP Discover message to identify available DHCP servers. DHCP Offer: DHCP servers respond with a…

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Understanding Network Address Translation (NAT)

Understanding Network Address Translation (NAT)

Network Address Translation (NAT) is a method used to map private IP addresses to a single public IP address. It allows multiple devices in a local network to access the internet using a shared public IP. But before exploring the NAT, Let’s see what is private and public network addresses. Private IP Addresses in Networking In networking, private addresses are reserved IP addresses that are not routable on the public internet. They are designated for use within private networks, allowing…

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Overview of Wireless LANs

Overview of Wireless LANs

Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) are a type of network that allows devices to connect and communicate without the need for physical cables. Unlike traditional wired networks, WLANs use radio waves to transmit data between devices. This wireless approach provides increased flexibility and mobility for connected devices. Frequency BandsWLANs operate within two main frequency bands: 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. The 2.4 GHz band, though more crowded, offers a better range, making it suitable for environments with obstacles. On the…

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Introduction to Routing in Computer Networks

Introduction to Routing in Computer Networks

Routing is an important function in computer networking that involves directing data packets from one device to another across a network. It ensures that information reaches its destination efficiently and accurately. Routers are the key devices responsible for making routing decisions in a network. Understanding Static Routing Static routing is a routing method where network administrators manually configure the routing table on a router. In this approach, the routing decisions are predetermined and do not change unless modified by the…

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DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) & Cable Modem

DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) & Cable Modem

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) is a broadband technology that revolutionized internet access by using traditional telephone lines, offering high-speed connectivity and an “always-on” connection. In contrast, cable modems leverage cable television infrastructure, providing swift bidirectional communication for high-bandwidth internet access, making them popular in urban and suburban areas despite occasional network congestion challenges. Let’s look in detail at these technologies; DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) is a broadband technology that provides high-speed internet access over traditional telephone…

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Circuit Switching and Packet Switching in Computer Networks

Circuit Switching and Packet Switching in Computer Networks

Circuit switching and packet switching represent two distinct paradigms in the realm of data communication. Circuit switching creates a dedicated communication path for the entire duration of a conversation, ensuring a continuous link between devices. In contrast, packet switching involves breaking data into independent packets, allowing for flexible routing and efficient resource utilization across the network. What is Circuit Switching? Circuit switching is a communication method where a dedicated communication path or circuit is established between two devices for the…

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CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) and VLSM (Variable Length Subnet Masking)

CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) and VLSM (Variable Length Subnet Masking)

In the realm of networking, two pivotal concepts revolutionized the way we allocate and manage IP addresses: CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) and VLSM (Variable Length Subnet Masking). CIDR emerged as a response to the limitations of traditional IP addressing, introducing a more flexible and efficient approach to representing IP address ranges. On the other hand, VLSM, a crucial extension of CIDR, empowers network administrators with the ability to optimize subnetting by allowing variable-length subnet masks. Together, CIDR and VLSM have…

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